Thursday, April 8, 2021

leaving part 1

 As we regrouped in North Pole after our post-Fairbanks plans changed, we were still thinking about the same things that had led us to sell the house in Fairbanks. The issues had not changed and we still needed to figure out what we should do next. Once Bill had learned that he could get Irish citizenship by descent, he began gathering the documentation he would need. He first got birth, marriage, death certificates from the United States. Once we had those, it was time to try to get the documentation needed from Ireland. When we looked into how to do this, we discovered that we would need to send in a form with a year on it. They would look for records from that year and the year before and year after as well. We were left to guess a bit here, because we weren’t sure about his grandfather’s year of birth and while we had a date for his grandmother, we were aware that this might not be accurate, since somehow we learned that she had lied about her age on her marriage certificate as she was a bit older than her new husband. So we guessed for both of them and sent in the paperwork. They found nothing for that time frame for his grandfather. Records were often lost and at the time, Ireland was still colonized by the British, who were extremely brutal towards the native Irish people in many ways, including exporting food while Irish people starved to death. Birth records were easily lost or destroyed. It was suggested that we could try church records or submit another form with another year. This was not necessary, though, because they did find records for his grandmother. That’s all we needed. Even though we had all the documentation, we decided to wait until we knew what we’d be doing and where we’d be before sending in the citizenship application. It said it could take 18 months. Who knew where we would be by then? We were pretty sure it wouldn’t be in North Pole.

We went around and around about this until finally we had a plan. We called the realtor who’d sold us the place a year before and he came over to chat. We told him we wanted to sell and asked whether someone else could take over the contract or how we should go about it. He said he’d have to talk to the owner, but throughout the time we were sitting there and while we were talking and he was answering, he was looking around. Suddenly, he said, ‘Maybe I’ll buy it. Yes, I think I will. I’ll buy it!’ This was a surprise! He whipped out his calculator and tapped away. He looked up and offered us $5000 more than we’d paid for it a year before. Stunned, we accepted the offer. 

15 comments:

  1. Wow great story!

    So this is how you went back to Engand-Do you have any contackt with the people who bought the house..is it still there Greetings!

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    1. Never been in England, but we were thrilled that Bill could get Irish citizenship! 😀 I don't know about the house or what happened there after we left.

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  2. Records in Ireland are notoriously difficult to trace I’ve found.

    Wow. What a great realtor. Hope I can find one like that when we are ready to sell.

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    1. We were shocked, but in a good way 🙂

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  3. Wow, that's great! You lucked out getting that particular realtor, most wouldn't have done that I'm sure.

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    1. It was pure chance that he happened to be the one who had the listing when we bought it. We had no idea then how it would work out a year later. As you say, we lucked out!

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  4. Siempre es bueno los cambios y tuvieron suerte. Te mando un beso

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    1. It's true! Change can be hard, but also very rewarding :-)

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  5. The Grandmother lied because of being older?! LOL...
    Oh, I never knew of the history with British!

    Such a lucky ending!!!

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    1. It did work out well for us :-)

      Yes, Ireland has only been an independent country for around a century. A few years ago, we went to see a documentary called Older Than Ireland, in which centenarians talked about their lives. They were born in a colonized country and lived through the years of struggle to independence. This doesn't include Northern Ireland, of course, which continues to be sort of a mess in the middle. But there are still tense feelings among people in the Republic, particularly in Donegal, towards the Brits, which I understand much better now, having been here for a while. There is growing talk of a border poll and a united Ireland, but I am not sure how much support there would be for that in the Republic at this point.

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  6. An interesting read and what a good offer!

    All the best Jan

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